#064: Finding and Living Our Strengths (with Leisa Anslinger) - REPLAY

Leisa Anslinger

Leisa Anslinger

This is a special re-broadcast of our episode from May, 2018.

The celebration of Pentecost demands that we consider not just the ways in which the Spirit is at work in our lives, but also what unique gifts we possess and how we are called to use them in service to others. To paraphrase the reading from Corinthians, there are many different gifts, and we have each received them for some benefit.

But, though the spirit is a great gift-giver, we aren’t always great gift-receivers. It is more natural for us to covet the gifts and talents of others than to see the value of what we ourselves possess. It’s hard to see how our strengths fit into the talent matrix of our families or the communities to which we belong. Yet, these strengths are, indeed, unique to us, and the employment of these talents is critical for the realization of the work of the Spirit. 

In today’s episode, we explore the concept of strengths, what they are, how to identify them, and how an authentic understanding and stewardship of strengths can engage our entire parish community. To do so, we’ll speak with stewardship expert Leisa Anslinger, and we’ll hear again from Pope Francis in this week’s Ministry Moment.

 

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Leisa Anslinger and her work, visit the Catholic Life and Faith website.

To read more about Strengths Finder and the Living Your Strengths program, visit the Gallup Organization's website.

To read the full text of Pope Francis' remarks from his General Audience on April 24, 2013, visit the Vatican website.

The recording of "Holy God, We Praise Thy Name" was produced by ILP. The recording of "Give Us Peace" was produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

For more information about the One Call Institute, visit the program website at www.onecallinstitute.org.

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#063: Recruiting and Retaining Volunteer Ministers (with Patti Such)

Patti Such

Patti Such

I once heard someone describe working with volunteer ministers in parishes as “concentric circles of challenge.” The first challenge is to find a way to engage potential volunteers. But, once you’ve found a way to break through, you’re met with the challenge of training them. Once you’ve found a way to navigate the difficulties of formation, you’re met with the challenge of scheduling them, and then of retaining them, and so forth. 

Today, we’re journeying head-on into these concentric circles to explore what works, and what doesn’t, when it comes to engaging, recruiting, and retaining parish volunteer ministers. To help us out, we’ll speak with Patti Such, who will offer a host of information to help frame our views and approaches toward volunteer recruitment and management. We’ll also hear from a recent blog post written by Diana Macalintal in this week’s “Ministry Moment.”

 

SHOW NOTES

To learn more about Patti, Rotunda Software, and the Ministry Scheduler Pro program, visit www.ministryschedulerpro.com. You can try the program for free for 30 days!

You can read Diana Macalintal’s blog post, “Why You Should Rethink the Choir’s Summer Break” on the Liturgy.Life website.

The recordings of “A New Commandment” (The Collegeville Composers Group) is published by Liturgical Press. “Discipleship Medley” (arr. Paul Tate) is published by GIA Publications. “Ubi Caritas” (Laurence Rosania) is published by OCP.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#062: Engaging Emerging Leaders (with Dr. Bob McCarty)

Dr. Bob McCarty

Dr. Bob McCarty

Over the last few years, NPM has undertaken a variety of new initiatives to serve the needs of the singing and praying church. Throughout the next few months, I’ll be bringing you conversations that highlight these programs and give updates as to their progress and development.

Today, we’re focusing on the topic of emerging leaders. As pastoral ministers, we are called to help identify and develop the gifts of lots of people in lots of ways: cantors, accompanists, lectors, ministers of hospitality, and more. Yet, we are often stymied by the challenge of succession planning. We ask ourselves: Who will come after us? Who will continue this work already begun? Where are the next generation of leaders?

To help us explore these questions and the challenges we face in answering them, we’re joined once again by Dr. Bob McCarty. We’ll also remember the late Rachel Held Evans in today’s Ministry Moment.

 

SHOW NOTES

To join Dr. Bob McCarty, Dr. Jeannie Downey-Vanover, and Michael Ruzicki for the second NPM Emerging Leaders Institute this summer at the national convention in Raleigh, North Carolina, visit the 2019 NPM convention website

To learn more about the project, "Going, Going, Gone: The Dynamics of Disaffiliation in Young Catholics," from St. Mary's Press, visit their Catholic research website. There you will find an executive summary of the research project, featured stories, audio and video features, and more. You can also purchase a copy of the study here.  

You can read Rachel Held Evans’ blog post, “New Songs,” on her website.

The recordings of “Heart of a Shepherd” (Rory Cooney with verses by Joseph Gelineau) and “A Shepherd’s Medley” (arr. Paul Tate) are published by GIA Publications. “The Lord is My Shepherd/El Señor es mi Pastor” (Mary Frances Reza) is published by OCP. “I Shall See” is published by Hampton Roads Music Group.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#061: Navigating the "Culture Wars" (with Dan Schutte)

Dan Schutte

Dan Schutte

If you are someone who uses social media, it doesn’t take long to discover that the so-called liturgical “culture wars” are alive and well. Post after post on page after page reveal the ugly and unhelpful reality of the conflict. Authentic, thoughtful conversation and dialogue rarely happen, which is both unfortunate and unproductive. What is left, at least on social media and in the blogosphere, is often hyperbole, entrenchment, and judgement. So, what is a pastoral musician to do? How do we navigate these conflicts and make sense of them? How do we see through the judgement, and how do we take steps forward in our pastoral ministry?

Today, we’ll hear a special workshop presentation from Dan Schutte. Offered at the 2018 NPM convention in Baltimore, Dan presented a workshop titled “Honoring Our Musical Diversity: Navigating the Culture Wars.” In this session, Dan led participants through an exploration of ways to integrate a variety of genres, including chant, contemporary, and traditional hymnody, to celebrate the richness of our sacred music heritage in the liturgy.

We will be back with new, original interviews next week.

SHOW NOTES

To find out more information about the 2019 NPM National Convention in Raleigh, North Carolina, visit the NPM website. You can view preliminary schedules, speaker and event information, and more. Register today!

For more information about Dan Schutte, visit his composer page at OCP. You can also visit his personal website: www.danschutte.com.

The recordings of “This Joyful Eastertide” (VREUCHTEN, arr. Richard Hillert) and “Ye Sons and Daughters” (O FILII ET FILIAE, arr. Josh Blakesley) are published by OCP.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#060: A Holy Week Companion

woman-at-well-wide.jpg

It’s Monday of Holy Week, and we’ve got a long road ahead of us. We all need a little more time for preparation – if not a few minutes more to rehearse, set the environment, prepare worship aids or scripts, then to prepare ourselves for the holiest days of the year. 

So, for today, I’m sharing with you an episode of the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal is an independent podcast project hosted by Zack Stachowski and by me. This episode is a special celebration of Lenten music. You’ll hear a range of great seasonal music from a variety of composers arranged around the final three Gospel readings for Lent, the “Scrutiny Gospels.” These readings are shared with us by composers Meredith Augustin, Ian Callanan, and Luke Rosen. We hope that this presentation serves as both a companion and a source of nourishment.  

Episode links

For more information on the “Open Your Hymnal” podcast, visit www.openyourhymnal.com.

You can purchase the song recordings you heard in this episode: “Parce Domine/Ubi Caritas” (arr. Jeremy Young), piano instrumental of “Lenten Suite” (Paul Tate), “Turn My Heart” (Marty Haugen), “Restless is the Heart” (Bernadette Farrell), “Lead Me, Lord” (Samuel Wesley), “Hosea” (Gregory Norbet), "piano instrumental of “Attende Domine” (Jerry Galipeau), “He Healed the Darkness of My Mind” (David Haas), “Open My Eyes” (Benedetto Marcello, arr. Dale Grotenhuis), “I Want to Walk as a Child of the Light” (Kathleen Thomerson), “Brille Tu Luz” (Stella Garcia Lopez, Rudy Lopez), quodlibet on “Were You There/Amazing Grace” (arr. Marcy Weckler Barr), piano instrumental on “Precious Lord” (Fr. Robert Koopmann, OSB), “With the Lord There is Mercy” (Val Parker), “When Jesus Wept” (William Billings), “We Shall Rise Again” (Jeremy Young), “Give Me Jesus” (arr. Meredith Augustin), and “Attende Domine” (arr. Trevor Thompson).

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#059: Hymns from Yesterday for Tomorrow (ft. Dr. Don Saliers)

Dr. Don Saliers

Dr. Don Saliers

At the end of each episode every week, I make a general ask for your suggestions of topics for future episodes. It’s been interesting to see what issues are on your minds, and I’ve done my best to incorporate the needs you’ve shared into the conversations we host. Often, the topics shared with me have to do in one way or another with repertoire development. So, today we’re going to open the repertoire conversation, but know that we’ll be picking up more repertoire-related topics in future episodes and NPM content. In fact, as coincidence would have it, the upcoming May issue of Pastoral Musicmagazine will focus on building repertoire.

So, let’s begin with hymnody. Hymns – both in reference to text and to tune – are so very important in the congregational life of the Church. Often, however, some communities think of hymns as artifacts rather than possibilities. Today we’ll challenge this assumption. To do so, we’ll hear from an article written by Dr. Don Saliers. Originally published in the April 1981 issue of Pastoral Music, Don helps break open what constitutes a “good” hymn and shares insight into the importance of hymn singing and the development of new hymns.

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Dr. Don Saliers, visit his biography page at the Candler School of Theology. You can read the full text of his article from the April 1981 issue of Pastoral Music magazine on the NPM website.

The recording of “Three Days” (THAXTED, arr. Jeffery Honore, text by MD Ridge) is published by OCP. The recordings of “Jesus, Keep Me Near the Cross” (William Howard Doane, text by Fanny Crosby) and “Jerusalem, My Destiny” (Rory Cooney) are published by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#058: Chant Clinic, Lent Edition (with Dr. Andre Heywood)

Dr. Andre Heywood

Dr. Andre Heywood

In a few weeks we will celebrate the holiest days of the year, the Triduum. No matter the musical resources you use or in which camp of the style wars your community finds itself, most of us will incorporate one or more of the chants traditionally sung during Holy Week. 

Now, today’s episode isn’t a conversation about what chants you should or shouldn’t use, or a discussion about why chant is important, though both of those are important topics. Instead, we’re providing a short “chant clinic” designed especially for those communities who might not often sing chant during the rest of the liturgical year, but who will be incorporating chant during the Triduum. How do you get your choir to shape chant melodies instead of plodding through them like a heavy march? How do you effectively lead a congregation not accustomed to chanting? What about that soloist who will be singing the Exultet?

To help us out, we’re joined once again by Dr. Andre Heywood, a master conductor, clinician, and choral scholar. In one of our most-downloaded episodes, Andre joined me back in Advent for a conversation about vocal health. Now during this Lenten season, he joins us with tactics you can start using right away to improve the quality of chant in your celebrations.

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Andre Heywood, visit The Saint John’s Boys’ Choir.

The recording of “Pange Lingua” (Fr. Ricky Manalo) is published by OCP. The recordings of “Parce Domine/Ubi Caritas” (arr. Jeremy Young) and “Jerusalem, My Destiny” (Rory Cooney) are published by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#057: Evangelization, Inclusion, and the Culture Wars (with Fr. James Martin, SJ) - REPLAY

Fr. James Martin, SJ

Fr. James Martin, SJ

This is a special re-broadcast of our episode from April, 2018.

Just as the Advent season prepares us for the Incarnation, and the Lenten season prepares us for the Resurrection, we know that the celebration of the Easter season prepares us for Commissioning: “Go, make disciples of all nations.” The Gospel readings of this season serve as a primer in discipleship: the model of the Good Shepherd, the vines bearing much fruit, the command to love one another as Christ has loved us. Yet, though it is, indeed, Good News, spreading the Gospel is hard work! There are many barriers in our way: limits of time and resources, an unfriendly or inhospitable popular culture, and – sometimes the biggest barrier of all – ourselves.

In today’s episode, we explore the topic of evangelization – how do we in pastoral ministry reach beyond those already active and in attendance? What works? What doesn’t? What mindset must we cultivate in order to be successful? We’ll also discuss two subsidiary topics: maintaining healthy balance, and navigating the culture wars being waged within the Church. To do so, we’ll hear from two people renowned for their efforts at evangelization: Fr. James Martin, SJ, and Jean Vanier.

 

SHOW NOTES

Fr. James Martin, SJ, is a Jesuit priest, editor at large of America magazine, consultor to the Vatican's Secretariat for Communications, and author of numerous books, including the New York Times bestsellers “Building A Bridge,” "Jesus: A Pilgrimage," and "The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything." You can find out more about his ministry and speaking engagements on his Facebook page.

To listen to more conversation with Fr. Jim, listen to the special feature from the Open Your Hymnal podcast.

To learn more about Jean Vanier, visit the L'Arche website

The recording of "Hosea” was produced by OCP.  The piano recording of "Break Bread Together" was performed by Fr. Robert Koopmann, OSB, on the album Sacred Improvisations

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#056: Engaging Young People with the One Call Institute (with Jes Garceau)

Jes Garceau

Jes Garceau

One of the many ways that NPM is able to support the work of pastoral musicians is through institutes. These programs feature a smaller, more intimate, more intense learning environment. In the coming weeks, we’ll be featuring these institutes in our Ministry Monday conversations.

I am proud to co-direct the One Call Institute, a proud member program of NPM. Taking place this coming summer from June 25 to June 30, the focus of One Call is to engage, support, and empower young people to use their gifts of music and leadership in service to the Church. We also shape adults who work in ministry, equipping them with the skills, information, and attitudes necessary to continue the work of engaging young people in their home communities. As an aside, you should know that applications are due on April 15, and our registrations have been pouring in. 

Today, I am pleased to welcome Jes Garceau, another One Call co-director to the show. Yes, we’ll talk about the program in the hopes that you’ll consider sending young people from your parish, and perhaps consider attending yourself. I hope you’ll listen as we share important details about the program. Beyond this, I’m really pleased that you will hear from Jes herself. With a background in liturgical ministry and corporate management, Jes is one of the most important voices and resources in effective ministry organization and administration. We’ll also hear a selection from composer Sally Ann Morris in this week’s “Ministry Moment”.

SHOW NOTES

You can read more about Jes by visiting the “About Us” page of the One Call Institute website.

To find out more information about One Call, and to complete your application, visit the “Apply” page today!

The recording of “All That is Hidden” (Bernadette Farrell) is published by OCP. The recordings of “Will You Hold Me in the Light?” (Adam Tice/Sally Ann Morris), and “Jerusalem, My Destiny” (Rory Cooney) are published by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#055: Understanding Lent as Pilgrimage

Sr. Patricia Gallagher, OP

Sr. Patricia Gallagher, OP

Many of us have a complex relationship with Lent. It’s a season that some love and some dread. It’s often a season that, intellectually, we appreciate and anticipate but, in reality, experience in a way that leaves us wanting more. Purely from a practical perspective, Lent is sometimes difficult to experience in a full and meaningful way when we are so occupied with preparations for the Triduum and Easter season.

That’s the place where we are beginning today: the ways that Lent prepares us for the Triduum and for Easter. If we think about this time of year as a “unified sequence,” as our guest writer calls it, we can see more clearly the influences that shape the ways we think about Lent, the way we experience it, and – ultimately – the way we experience the Easter joy. We’ll hear today from an article written by Sr. Patricia Gallagher, OP, and we’ll hear a beautiful setting of a text by Saint Clare in a musical “Ministry Moment.”

SHOW NOTES

You can read the full article, “Take Another Look at Lent: As Pilgrimage,” on the NPM website.

The recording of “Tis Good Lord to be Here” (Joseph Robinson) is published by OCP. The recordings of “Lenten Suite” (arr. Paul Tate), “The Mirror of Eternity” (James Chepponis), and “Jerusalem, My Destiny” (Rory Cooney) are published by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.