#047: Looking Ahead to Triduum (with Diana Macalintal) - REPLAY

Diana Macalintal

Diana Macalintal

Last week, our second installment of our “New Year Resolution” series explored liturgy planning with our guest, Christian Cosas. We are continuing that thread today, but we’re moving to a deeper and more specific application.  

Rachel Held Evans

Rachel Held Evans

While we’ve only been officially out of the Christmas for a matter of hours, it’s time to think about Lent and Easter. To assist with our resolution of planning ahead, and planning strategically, we’re bringing you a rebroadcast of our episode with Diana Macalintal. Originally published in April of 2018, our conversation explored ways to effectively evaluate and plan for the marathon days of Triduum. It was one of our most popular conversations of last year. So, sit back and enjoy this rebroadcast. We’ll be back with a new episode next week. 

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Doing real, objective evaluation of our liturgies, especially major celebrations like those during Triduum, is so important, yet can be difficult to get right. Often, we are tempted to do the evaluating in real time, while the liturgies are happening, but that prevents us from entering into the prayer and mystery of the celebration. Other times we are tempted to wait, and we do, but we wait too long and so forget what went well, what went wrong, or ideas about what might be done differently. Today our evaluation gets a boost from two important sources: Diana Macalintal provides a list of ten triduum pro-tips. Rachel Held Evans asks the question, “So how was your Easter…really?” 

 

SHOW NOTES

Download Diana's evaluation resources from today's episode by visiting her website.

You can find out more about Diana Macalintal and her work at www.TeamRCIA.com and at liturgy.life. You can find information about her publications by visiting the Liturgical Press. You can also find out more about her music compositions by visiting World Library Publications

You can read the full text of Rachel Held Evans' blog post, "So How Was Your Easter...Really?" on her website. The original post was dated April 9, 2012.

The recordings of “Gather Your People” and "Resucito" were produced by OCP. The recording of "Alleluia, Sing to Jesus," was produced by GIA Publications. 

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#046: Planning Goals for the New Year (with Christian Cosas)

Christian Cosas

Christian Cosas

Today we are continuing our series for the New Year. Traditionally, at the end of December, we set resolutions or goals for the new calendar year ahead. Over the next few episodes, we’ll be looking at ministerial resolutions to help inform your own goals and targets.  Last week we spoke with Timothy Johnston about setting goals for professional development. If you haven’t listened to that episode, I encourage you to check it out.

Today, we’ll hear from Christian Cosas about a new way to think about – and to track – your liturgy planning. Plus, we’ll hear some thoughts about the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord from Rory Cooney in this week’s Ministry Moment. 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Christian Cosas, visit his composer page at World Library Publications and his composer page at Simply Liturgical Music.

You can access examples of Christian’s planning template by visiting the resources page for his article, “Planning Music for Liturgy: Seeing the Forest for the Trees,” in the May-August 2018 edition of GIA Quarterly.

To read the full text of Rory Cooney’s blog post, visit the “Gentle Reign” website.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Healing River of the Spirit” (BEACH SPRING, text by Ruth Duck), instrumental arrangement of “Healing River of the Spirit” (arr. Maureen Briare), and “I Have Been Anointed” (Steve Warner).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#045: Learning Goals for the New Year (with Timothy Johnston)

Timothy Johnston

Timothy Johnston

Before we begin, let me wish all of you a very Merry Christmas. I am sure that some of you are still recovering from last week. Know that your work is greatly appreciated. Each of your communities is blessed with your efforts, your dedication, and your leadership. So on behalf of all of them, and on behalf of NPM, thank you!

While we still have plenty of Christmas season remaining, today we are turning our attention to the New Year. Traditionally, at the end of December, we set resolutions or goals for the new calendar year ahead. Over the next few episodes, we’ll be looking at ministerial resolutions to help inform your own goals and targets.  We’ll focus on formation, planning, and health.

To kick us off, we’ll speak today with editor and liturgy consultant Timothy Johnston about setting a vision for professional development. We’ll also hear some New Year’s resolutions from Pope Francis in this week’s Ministry Moment.

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Timothy Johnston’s work, visit the Liturgy Training Publications website.

For more information about the “Essentials of Catholic Liturgy” professional development course, offered as an online partnership between LTP and NPM, visit the NPM website.

To read the full text of Pope Francis’ address to Vatican employees and their families, visit the Vatican website.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “The First Noel” (traditional), and “Hark, the Herald Angels Sing” (arr Petrunak).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#044: The Final Countdown (with Carol Browning)

Zack Stachowski, Carol Browning, and Matt Reichert

Zack Stachowski, Carol Browning, and Matt Reichert

With only one calendar week to go before Christmas, we thought we’d provide an opportunity for a little stress break. There are lots of things to be done this week and errands to be run. Today’s show, providing both conversation and musical selections, is something perfect to listen to while you fold worship aids, make those final copies, wrap your gifts, and so forth.

In place of our customary interview, today we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and by me, is a special project aimed at breaking open the best-loved and most-common liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire. Each episode explores one song and features conversation with the composer and, sometimes, special guests. 

We are pleased to present today our interview with composer Carol Browning about her song “Creator of the Stars of Night,” incorporating one of the best-loved melodies of the Advent season. Composer Bob Moore stops by to talk about Carol’s music, and Fr. Anthony Ruff, OSB, gives some historical background to the 1,000-year-old chant hymn at the core of this piece. Plus, you’ll hear a bunch of great additional music in the OYH Playlist.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Carol Browning and her other compositions, visit her composer pages at GIA Publications, MorningStar Music, and Liturgical Press.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording for "Creator of the Stars of Night” from GIA Publications. You can also purchase the other song recordings you heard in this episode: Instrumental arrangement of “Gloria from Mass of Light” (David Haas), “Silent Night" (arr. Steve Petrunak), organ recording of “Creator of the Stars of Night” (arr. John Keys), "Conditor Alma Siderum" (traditional), "Ubi Caritas" (Carol Browning), "O God, Behold Your Family Here" (Bob Moore), “Christ, Circle Round Us" (Dan Schutte), “Peace be With Those” (Carol Browning), “Carol of the Dawn” (Janet Sullivan Whitacre), “Ave Generosa” (Ola Gjielo), and “People Look East” (arr. Marty Haugen). 

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#043: Finding Ways to Thrive During Advent

Anna Betancourt

Anna Betancourt

Orin Johnson

Orin Johnson

Matt Maus

Matt Maus

Today we continue the thread we began last week: Advent episodes meant to connect, to share, and – in some cases – to triage. In this series, you’ll hear practical tips, suggestions, and ideas to do more than just survive this busy season. Most importantly, you’ll hear from other pastoral musicians working in the “trenches,” just like you.  

Last week we spoke with Andre Heywood, who shared with us his tips for choral vocal health during this time when extra singing meets “cold and flu season.” Today, you’ll hear from four different guests: Anna Betancourt, Orin Johnson, Matt Maus, and Teresa Yoder. All of them are music directors with at least one parish. All of them have additional responsibilities, such as leading other ensembles, teaching, or keeping another job. They all work in different parts of the United States, and they all answered the same questions, sharing their own perspectives, wisdom, and experience. 

It is tempting to think of Advent as something to endure or get through. But, this approaches this important and holy time through a deficit lens. And, if we have been thinking of Advent in survival terms, it’s difficult to change when the season is already half over. So, you will hear our guests respond to two questions: What do you do in order to thrive during Advent? And, what can we do today to start thriving, too?

Teresa Yoder

Teresa Yoder

SHOW NOTES

For more information about about our guests, click on their names below:

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Creator of the Stars of Night” (Browning), and “Christ, Circle Round Us” (Schutte).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#042: Vocal Care, Advent Edition (with Andre Heywood, ft. Luke Rosen)

Andre Heywood

Andre Heywood

You and I both know how busy this time of year is. I’ve said it on this program before, and you are feeling it out there, working and rehearsing and planning and more. So, I won’t belabor the point. What I will say, however, is that we are here to help. One of the most consistent comments NPM hears from members is how valuable it is to be connected to other people doing similar work. It doesn’t feel so lonely or isolated, and it is helpful to discover best practices and to learn from one another.

Luke D. Rosen

Luke D. Rosen

So, over the next three weeks, we will be presenting Advent episodes meant to connect, to share, and – in some cases – to triage. You’ll hear practical tips, suggestions, and ideas. Most importantly, you’ll hear from other pastoral musicians working in the “trenches,” just like you.

To kick us off, we are beginning with Andre Heywood. An exceptional choral conductor and in-demand clinician, Andre will share with us his tips for choral vocal health during this time when extra singing meets “cold and flu season.” We’ll also hear an original Advent reflection from Luke Rosen in this week’s Ministry Moment.

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Andre Heywood, visit The Saint John’s Boys’ Choir. For more information about Luke Rosen, visit his website.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Come, Emmanuel” (Tate), “Prelude: O Come, O Come, Emmanuel” (Tate), and “Christ, Circle Round Us” (Schutte).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#041: A New Year; a Familiar Journey

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Happy New Year! While the new calendar year doesn’t begin for another five weeks, we are about to begin the new liturgical year. Usually, a new calendar year brings time for reflection on the year that is ending, and time for setting resolutions for the year ahead. Unfortunately, for many of us in pastoral ministry, we don’t get to start our new liturgical year with the same sort of intentional reflection that is common at the start of the calendar year. We’re in the thick of holiday preparations, we’ve got special rehearsals, Advent lessons and carols, penance services, school programs, family celebrations, and so forth. Further, in the secular world, we’ve already been celebrating Christmas since the end of October. 

So, today, we’re providing a brief pause at the start of the new liturgical year. We are sharing two pieces to help frame the Advent season. The first is a reflection on the liturgical year – the importance of time, the meaning of the journey. The second is a comparison of American culture and American worship, exploring how the values of each are complimentary to – or, as often as not, in conflict with – one another.

As you listen to these explorations, I encourage you to listen to them through the lens of Advent. How does our celebration of Advent change when we consider it in the context of the entire liturgical year, viewing it as the first steps on our liturgical pilgrimage? How is our celebration of Advent mired in the competing values of popular culture? In our roles as liturgical leaders, how can we intentionally form our ensembles, our colleagues, and our communities so that the message of Advent might be communicated clearly to all?

SHOW NOTES

You can read the full articles you heard read in today’s episode by visiting the Pastoral Music magazine archive.

You can purchase the music you heard in today’s episode: “This is Your Justice” (Colson), “Comfort, Comfort O My People” (arr. Alonso), and “Christ, Circle Round Us” (Schutte).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#040: Giving Thanks

Thanksgiving.jpg

Here in the United States, we are gearing up for another holiday week. I don’t know about all of you, but, for myriad reasons, Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. I enjoy the food, the counting of blessings, the time spent with family and friends, the pause, the reflection. 

But, while my enthusiasm for Thanksgiving has not waned over the years, the simplicity of my understanding has. I recognize that Thanksgiving can stir a complex and sometimes conflicting sense of emotion. Not all celebrations are peaceful. Not all tallies of blessings seem to be as long. Not all family gatherings are akin to Norman Rockwell. 

In a particular way this year, I think of the challenges we face in our Church, our communities, country, and our world. Scandal. Division. Violence. Natural disasters. Illness. War. Anger. Apathy. 

So, today, in the midst of the messiness of life, we are pausing to give thanks. To do so, we’ll hear from the writings of four voices, each helping explore what it means to be grateful. I’m hoping you’ll find this to be a sort of mini-retreat, and so I’ve interspersed music selections between each reading. If you can’t listen to the entire episode at once, listen to a portion each day. I hope you are able to find time this week to let these words and melodies sink in, challenging and affirming, and, in a special way, feeding and forming. 

SHOW NOTES

You can find like to the works you heard read in today’s episode by clicking on the name of the author: Abraham Lincoln, Fr. Romano Guardini, Pope Francis, Sr. Joan Chittister, OSB, and Br. David Steindl-Rast, OSB.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Come You Thankful People Come” (arr. Alonso), piano improvisation on “Simple Gifts,” “We Plow the Fields and Scatter,” “Thanks Be to Thee,” (Handel), “O God You Search Me” (Farrell), “Earth and All Stars,” and “Give Us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#039: Formation and Connection, Delivered to Your Doorstep (with Kathy Felong)

Kathy Felong

Kathy Felong

This past year, NPM offered its forty-first convention. For more than four decades, NPM has been gathering, forming, and celebrating pastoral musicians in national and regional conventions offered across the country. For just as long – in fact, for a little longer – NPM has offered formation, celebration, and connection through the publication of Pastoral Music magazine. 

Today, we’re talking about the NPM magazine as it transitions to a new editorial staff. We’ll discuss the following questions: Why, when we so often hear that print media is dying, does NPM continue to offer a magazine? What impact does NPM hope the magazine will have on the practice of its members? What can we expect to find in the new issue when it lands in our mailboxes in a few weeks? And more. To explore these questions, we’ll speak with Kathy Felong, the new editor of NPM’s magazine. We’ll also hear an excerpt from Pope Francis’ message on World Communications Day 2018 in this week’s Ministry Moment.

SHOW NOTES

The newest issue of Pastoral Music will be arriving in mailboxes around Thanksgiving Day. Members of NPM automatically receive a copy. If you aren’t a member yet, sign up today!

For more information about Beyond Strumming, visit GIA Publications.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Find Us Ready” (Booth), “Piano Improvisation on ‘Break Bread Together’” (Koopmann), and “Give Us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#038: Instrumental Invitation (with Zack Stachowski)

Zack Stachowski

Zack Stachowski

You’ve heard us mention repeatedly the importance of invitation in our work as pastoral ministers. It’s a challenging topic, partly because we need to learn how to do it (though we’ve got a pretty good idea). Mostly, it’s difficult because invitation is often an exercise in vulnerability. We’ve got to relearn, retrain, risk failure, and so forth. 

Today, we’re digging deeper into the topic of invitation to speak specifically about instrumentalists. Why do we invite instrumentalists differently than we do singers? What can we do to better extend welcome to the members of our community who have instrumental skills to offer? We’ll speak with composer and teacher Zack Stachowski, who will issue a special Christmas season challenge. We’ll also hear from the writings of Fr. Matthew Kelty in this week’s Ministry Moment.

SHOW NOTES

You can find out more about Zack Stachowski and his work by visiting the home pages for the One Call Institute and the Open Your Hymnal podcast.

For more information about Give Us This Day, visit Liturgical Press.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Behold the Lamb” (Willett), and “Give Us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.