#036: Stepping Outside the Routine (from Ken Meltz)

For the last four weeks, I’ve been inviting you to share your feedback and suggestions for this program through our first listener survey. Thank you to those of you who took the time to respond. We are busy reading through your comments and analyzing the data and will use what you shared to inform our program planning into the future.  

If you missed out on the survey, don’t fret! You can always share your thoughts with us through our website, ministrymonday.org. 

Many of our survey responses told us that you appreciated hearing voices from the past – audio recordings from conventions or workshops from ten, twenty, or even forty years ago. Of course, one of the challenges of bringing your archival recordings is that the sound quality is often rough, and there is only so much I can do to improve it. Many of you also shared that you found topics related to the spirituality of ministry to be helpful and impactful. 

So, today, we’re going to try to hit two targets with one episode. We are pleased to share with you an article on the spiritual life of pastoral musicians and liturgical ministers. Originally written for the April 1987 issue of Pastoral Music Magazine, author and composer Ken Meltz shares ways for we who are music makers to ground ourselves in liturgical spirituality. Titled, “Stepping Outside the Routine,” Ken reflects on the proliferation of the term “spirituality,” and on the fact that we pastoral ministers often do a poor job of feeding our own spiritual and prayer lives.

SHOW NOTES

To read the original article from Ken Meltz, access the April 1987 issue of Pastoral Magazine.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Spirit of God” (J. Moore), and “Give Us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#035: Shaping Unity While Honoring Diversity (with Bob Hurd)

Matt Reichert, Bob Hurd, and Zack Stachowski

Matt Reichert, Bob Hurd, and Zack Stachowski

A few weeks ago, we featured a workshop presentation given by Jaime Cortez on the topic of planning and leading bi-cultural liturgies. We heard from many of you, thanking us for featuring an important topic and for providing practical, useful tactics that you could use in your own community. Today, we continue this important conversation, this time exploring the ways we can shape unity within our communities while still honoring diversity.

So, in place of our customary interview, today we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and by me, is a special project aimed at breaking open the best-loved and most-common liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire. Each episode explores one song and features conversation with the composer and, sometimes, special guests. 

We are pleased to present today our interview with composer Bob Hurd about his song “Pan de Vida,” one of the earliest and best-loved examples of purpose-built bilingual liturgical music. Bob discusses what influences his music, how he relies on scripture for his texts, and the best ways we can bring unity to a world and a Church that is increasingly divided. This is a great conversation for anyone who ministers in a multi-cultural setting. 

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Bob Hurd and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the original song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase a copy of the recording of "Pescador de Hombres" (by Cesareo Gabarain) and "Gather Your People" (by Bob Hurd, Craig Kingsbury, & Dominic MacAller).

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording of "Pan de Vida" (arranged and performed by Jon Sarta) from iTunes. Here you can also purchase a copy of the recording of "O Magnum Mysterium" (by Morten Lauridsen).

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#034: Evangelization for Busy Catholics (with Amy Right, ft. Pope Paul VI)

Amy Righi

Amy Righi

We’ve already discussed the topic of Evangelization in previous episodes. I’m sure your bookshelf has at least a handful of resources related to the subject. I’m sure you’ve been to at least one meeting or workshop where evangelization was discussed. 

So, how are your efforts faring? 

Pope Francis is often quoted as saying that Christ knocks on our hearts to be let in, and on the doors of our churches to be let out. We often think of evangelizing as going out – and certainly, it is. But we also hope that the end result of our going out will be to have others come in – to join our community, to worship with us, to enter the fullness of the Church.

Today, we’ll hear about one parish’s initiative to increase their engagement with the families in their community. St. Isidore’s Catholic Church in Macomb, Michigan, began offering an evening Mass on Sunday’s. Billed as the “Mass for Busy Catholics,” it was an attempt to open the door just a little further and to give more opportunities for worship. Now, another weekend Mass might not be the answer for your community. However, I hope that you hear in this conversation the importance of being open, trying new things, and meeting families where they are. We’ll also hear from a soon-to-be Saint, Pope Paul VI, in this week’s Ministry Moment.

 

SHOW NOTES

Take the Ministry Monday listener survey!

For more information about Amy Righi, visit her bio page on the St. Isidore Catholic Church website. You can read the article about St. Isidore’s “Mass for Busy Catholics” from the Michigan Catholic newspaper.

You can read the full text of Evangelii Nuntiandi on the Vatican’s website.

You can purchase the music you heard in today’s episode: “The Summons” (arr. Bobby Fisher) and “Give us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#033: How to Think About Engaging Young People (with Dr. Bob McCarty, featuring Sr. Anne Bryan Smolin, CSJ) - REPLAY

Disaffiliation Book.png

Each major convention of Catholic organizations includes at least one session that address a variation of the question, "Where have the youth gone?" In today's episode, we speak with Dr. Bob McCarty about new research into the disaffiliation of young Catholics, why we are asking wrong questions, and what the take-aways are for those of us in liturgical and pastoral ministry. We also hear from Sr. Anne Bryan Smollin, CSJ (1943-2014) on the dynamic importance of "the little things" in building and enriching interpersonal relationships. 

 

SHOW NOTES

To attend the One Call Institute, developing the music and leadership skills of young pastoral musicians, visit our website at www.onecallinstitute.org.

To learn more about the project, "Going, Going, Gone: The Dynamics of Disaffiliation in Young Catholics," from St. Mary's Press, visit their Catholic research website. There you will find an executive summary of the research project, featured stories, audio and video features, and more. You can also purchase a copy of the study here.  

You can purchase Sr. Anne Bryan Smollin's books by visiting the Ave Maria Press website.

You can view a video recording of Sr. Anne Bryan's full presentation entitled "Little Things Mean a Lot," on YouTube. To learn more about the Los Angeles Religious Education Congress, visit their website at www.recongress.org.

"From Ashes to the Living Font" is published by World Library Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#032: Reimagining Membership - A Call to Action (with Stephen Petrunak)

Steve Petrunak

Steve Petrunak

Take the Ministry Monday listener survey!

When we began this podcast, our first episode was published on the first Monday of Lent. Our guest for that show was Steve Petrunak, the president of NPM. In that episode we spoke about Steve’s vision for NPM, some of the projects that were in the works, and more. Now, thirty-one episodes later, we’re welcoming Steve back to the show. 

 But, this time, Steve isn’t here to provide an update. In his time as president, NPM has faced a variety of changes both within the organization and without. These changes have sparked new strategies and initiatives, sure, but have also caused questioning and introspection. 

So, today, we’ll speak with Steve about one of the basic building blocks of any organization: membership. How should we, the members of NPM, think about the organization? How to we relate to it? How should it serve our needs? 

 

SHOW NOTES

Take the Ministry Monday listener survey!

To contact Steve Petrunak, visit the “Ask the President” page on the NPM website.

You can read the full text of Gaudete et Exultate on the Vatican’s website.

You can purchase the music you heard in today’s episode: “The Servant Song” (Gillard, arr. O’Brien) and “Give us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#031: Planning and Leading Bi-Cultural Celebrations (with Jaime Cortez)

Jaime Cortez

Jaime Cortez

I know we are only at the midpoint of September, but for those of us in liturgical ministry, we are already thinking about Thanksgiving, Advent, and Christmas. Now, today’s episode isn’t about picking Advent repertoire and you won’t hear any Christmas music in our soundtrack. Soon, you’ll get your fill of premature holiday cheer at your local Target or Starbucks. 

Instead, we’re focusing on a different issue. At the end of each podcast episode, I always ask you, our listeners, to contact us and recommend topics for future episodes. So far, many of our guests and topics have been suggested by you. Today, we’re discussing a topic we’ve received a lot of questions about – how do we better plan and lead bi-cultural liturgies? Many parishes have separate liturgies offered in more than one language, often English and Spanish. What do we do, then, for those celebrations when our entire parish community is gathered, like at Thanksgiving, Christmas, Holy Thursday, and so forth?

Today, we’ll hear a special workshop presentation from composer and teacher Jaime Cortez. Offered at this year’s NPM convention in Baltimore, Jaime’s workshop was titled “Bi-Cultural Communities Celebrate Feasts, Solemnities, and Seasons.” In his session, Jaime sought to answer an important question: “How do we merge the traditions of different cultures and create a new tradition that all will find meaningful?”

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Jaime Cortez, visit his bio page at OCP.

You can purchase the music you heard in today’s episode: “Malo, Malo, Thanks be to God!” (Manibusan) and “Give us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#030: Exploring the New Misal Romano, Tercio Edicion (with Rita Thiron, ft. Eleazar Cortes)

Rita Thiron

Rita Thiron

In 2011, parishes in the United States implemented the English translation of the third edition of the Roman Missal. The implementation came after hosts of workshops, conferences, training sessions, new Mass settings, rehearsals, new pew cards or projection screens, and a range of emotional reaction. 

Eleazar Cortes

Eleazar Cortes

Now, in 2018, parishes in the United States are preparing for the implementation of another translation of the Roman Missal. Finally, after years of waiting, a new Spanish translation of the third edition of the Roman Missal has been approved for use in the United States. Across the country, parishes have already been using the new Misal Romano since May, and all are to take up its use by the first Sunday of Advent. 

Today, we’re discussing this new translation, its genesis, what you can expect to find, tips for pastoral implementation, and more. To do so, we’re speaking with Rita Thiron, the executive director of the Federation for Diocesan Liturgical Commissions. We’ll hear a song from composer Eleazar Cortes in today’s Ministry Moment.

 

SHOW NOTES

To find out more information about Rita Thiron, the Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions, or the resources for the new Misal Romano, visit the FDLC website at www.fdlc.org.

You can find more information about Eleazar Cortes by visiting his composer page at OCP.

You can purchase the music you heard in today's episode: "Take Up Your Cross" (Jaime Cortez), "O Dios, Crea en Mi" (Eleazar Cortes), "Give Us Peace" (Leon Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

 

#029: Celebrating Vocation (with David Haas, ft. Parker Palmer)

David Haas

David Haas

The topic of “vocation” is of great importance to us, though usually hearing that word conjures images of the priesthood or calls to religious life. Vocation, as we know, is something we all possess, regardless of ordination or consecration. We all long to discern what we should do with our lives, trying to match our greatest gifts, our passions, and the needs we see around us. 

Parker Palmer

Parker Palmer

Today, as we in the United States commemorate the Labor Day holiday, we are focusing on vocation. To do so, we’ll speak with composer and author David Haas as he reflects on forty years of writing liturgical music, and we’ll hear an excerpt from author Parker Palmer in today’s Ministry Moment.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about David Haas, visit his composer pages at GIA Publications and OCP. You can also visit his personal website at www.davidhaas.us. Here you can find more information about the book I Will Bring You Home, and the accompanying concert tour. 

You can find information about Ken Canedo and his books, referenced in today's conversation, at OCP.

You can find more information about Parker Palmer and his book Let Your Life Speak at the website www.letyourlifespeak.com

The recordings of "Take, O Take Me as I Am" and "Give Us Peace" were produced by GIA Publications. 

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#028: Yesterday, Today, and Forever (with ValLimar Jansen)

ValLimar Jansen

ValLimar Jansen

While the first day of Autumn is a few weeks away, summer is effectively over as the school year begins in districts and dioceses across the country. This means that, for many parishes, the new music ministry season is upon us, too. Just like classroom teachers, music ministers are welcoming back familiar faces, returning to regular schedules, and once again asking age-old questions like, “how could they have forgotten so much over the summer?” 

As we start up the new year, we thought it would be good to start with a pep talk. And who better to give it than ValLimar Jansen? Today, we’ll hear a reprise of ValLimar’s keynote given at this year’s national convention. 

Here is the official description:

"Imagine you are in a concert hall and Itzhak Perlman is performing on stage. The hair stands up on the back of your neck and you can barely take a breath. Perlman's passion flows into the room. He is aflame. He has mastered the rules and technique and yet they are far from his thinking. He has transcended the rubrics and yet upholds them. They have become a part of his musical instincts. Passion for the musical moment consumes him and he is consumed by the music. Can we praise God like this? Can we get there in liturgical music ministry? Yes, we can!"

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about ValLimar Jansen, visit her bio page at OCP. You can also visit her personal website at www.vallimar.com.

You can watch a video recording of ValLimar's keynote address on the NPM YouTube channel. NOTE: This recording will only be available on YouTube for a short period of time. It will eventually be archived in the "members only" section of the NPM website.

The recordings of "They Who Do Justice" and "Give Us Peace" were produced by GIA Publications. 

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#027: Ministering in Time of Scandal

Last week, I began our show with a joke. It’s hard to imagine starting with a joke today. This past week, the grand jury report investigating the sexual abuse of minors within six dioceses in Pennsylvania was released. We’ve all been reeling, trying to navigate the flood of emotions: shock, horror, disgust, anger, grief. 

I know, too, that many of you feel doubly lost. Lost because of this range of emotions, yes, but also lost because you are unsure of how to respond. Unsure of how you yourself should move forward, but also unsure of how to respond to the questions and hurt and anger of others. Pastoral ministers are visible, we are accessible, and we can often become the go-to people for members of our communities. But, what do we do when we don’t know what to say? What do we do when we, too, are angry and outraged?

I’m not sure that I know exactly what to feature, or whom to speak with, in order to help in this critical time. I do know that it’s important to address this head on and to keep the conversation open. So, today, I’m offering what follows in the hopes that, wherever you are on this journey, you might find something of value.

 

SHOW NOTES

The recording of "Stumbling Blocks and Stepping Stones" was produced by GIA Publications. The piano recording of "Balm in Gilead" was performed by Fr. Robert Koopmann, OSB, on the album Sacred Improvisations

You can find additional resources here:

1. GIA Publications "Hymns for Healing"

2. World Library Publications "We Stand in Hope"

3. PrayTell Blog "Preaching Abuse" and "When a Solemnity and Scandal Fall on the Same Day"

4. Fr. James Martin "The Virtues of Catholic Anger"

5. New compositions by Zack Stachowski and Orin Johnson

You can read the full text of Lumen Gentium by visiting the Vatican website.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.