#028: Yesterday, Today, and Forever (with ValLimar Jansen)

 ValLimar Jansen

ValLimar Jansen

While the first day of Autumn is a few weeks away, summer is effectively over as the school year begins in districts and dioceses across the country. This means that, for many parishes, the new music ministry season is upon us, too. Just like classroom teachers, music ministers are welcoming back familiar faces, returning to regular schedules, and once again asking age-old questions like, “how could they have forgotten so much over the summer?” 

As we start up the new year, we thought it would be good to start with a pep talk. And who better to give it than ValLimar Jansen? Today, we’ll hear a reprise of ValLimar’s keynote given at this year’s national convention. 

Here is the official description:

"Imagine you are in a concert hall and Itzhak Perlman is performing on stage. The hair stands up on the back of your neck and you can barely take a breath. Perlman's passion flows into the room. He is aflame. He has mastered the rules and technique and yet they are far from his thinking. He has transcended the rubrics and yet upholds them. They have become a part of his musical instincts. Passion for the musical moment consumes him and he is consumed by the music. Can we praise God like this? Can we get there in liturgical music ministry? Yes, we can!"

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about ValLimar Jansen, visit her bio page at OCP. You can also visit her personal website at www.vallimar.com.

You can watch a video recording of ValLimar's keynote address on the NPM YouTube channel. NOTE: This recording will only be available on YouTube for a short period of time. It will eventually be archived in the "members only" section of the NPM website.

The recordings of "They Who Do Justice" and "Give Us Peace" were produced by GIA Publications. 

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#027: Ministering in Time of Scandal

Last week, I began our show with a joke. It’s hard to imagine starting with a joke today. This past week, the grand jury report investigating the sexual abuse of minors within six dioceses in Pennsylvania was released. We’ve all been reeling, trying to navigate the flood of emotions: shock, horror, disgust, anger, grief. 

I know, too, that many of you feel doubly lost. Lost because of this range of emotions, yes, but also lost because you are unsure of how to respond. Unsure of how you yourself should move forward, but also unsure of how to respond to the questions and hurt and anger of others. Pastoral ministers are visible, we are accessible, and we can often become the go-to people for members of our communities. But, what do we do when we don’t know what to say? What do we do when we, too, are angry and outraged?

I’m not sure that I know exactly what to feature, or whom to speak with, in order to help in this critical time. I do know that it’s important to address this head on and to keep the conversation open. So, today, I’m offering what follows in the hopes that, wherever you are on this journey, you might find something of value.

 

SHOW NOTES

The recording of "Stumbling Blocks and Stepping Stones" was produced by GIA Publications. The piano recording of "Balm in Gilead" was performed by Fr. Robert Koopmann, OSB, on the album Sacred Improvisations

You can find additional resources here:

1. GIA Publications "Hymns for Healing"

2. World Library Publications "We Stand in Hope"

3. PrayTell Blog "Preaching Abuse" and "When a Solemnity and Scandal Fall on the Same Day"

4. Fr. James Martin "The Virtues of Catholic Anger"

5. New compositions by Zack Stachowski and Orin Johnson

You can read the full text of Lumen Gentium by visiting the Vatican website.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#026: Music Theory, Revisited (with Keith Kalemba, ft. Aaron Copland)

 Keith Kalemba

Keith Kalemba

When you look at those of us serving in the ranks of pastoral musicians, the variance in our music training is just as vast as the variance in our training in scripture, or liturgy, or theology. Some of us took lessons when we were growing up, and some of us learned to play by ear. Some of us studied music in college or graduate school, and some of us haven’t studied formal music theory at all. 

 Aaron Copland

Aaron Copland

Regardless, it is our contention that understanding and utilizing basic music theory concepts are important to effective pastoral music ministry. Today, our goal is to explore this assertion. It is my hope that we’ll challenge those of you who have not studied theory to begin to learn the basics, and that we’ll challenge those of you with years of study to use that information in ways that can boost the knowledge and skills of your ensembles and colleagues. To help us with these tasks, we’ll speak with Keith Kalemba, and we’ll hear from the writings of composer Aaron Copland in today’s Ministry Moment. 

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Keith Kalemba, visit his bio page at World Library Publications.

You can find the Interval Song Chart generator by visiting the EarMaster website.

The recordings of "Make Us True Servants" was produced by World Library Publications. "Eat This Bread" and "Give Us Peace" were produced by GIA Publications. The piano recording of "Resignation" was performed by Fr. Robert Koopmann, OSB, on the album Sacred Improvisations

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#025: The Singing Priest (with Fr. Ricky Manalo, CSP)

 Fr. Ricky Manalo, CSP

Fr. Ricky Manalo, CSP

Pastoral musicians spend a great deal of effort trying to get people to sing. Our work is animated by the desire to assist the “full, active, and conscious participation” of every person in our assembly. We often select music that is familiar. We spend a great deal of time introducing new music with pedagogic strategies that are measured, reasonable, and pastoral. We put hymns in comfortable keys, we train instrumentalists to support congregational singing, and we form our cantors to be song leaders, not soloists. 

For the most part, I’m willing to be we do a pretty good job of promoting and facilitating the sung prayer of those gathered in the pews. But, there is another voice that may need a bit more coaxing and a more delicate pastoral approach. Whose voice is it? Your pastor. 

It can be difficult to get your pastor – or deacon, or bishop – to sing. Yet, singing is vital to our liturgy, especially for the role of the presider. The solutions can be tricky because the cause of the hesitancy – or refusal – on the part of your pastor can be varied and complex. To peel back these layers and to discuss some strategies, we turn to Fr. Ricky Manalo. We’ll hear one of Fr. Ricky’s compositions in today’s Ministry Moment. 

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Fr. Ricky Manalo, CSP, and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP and his personal website

To listen to the Open Your Hymnal podcast episode featuring Fr. Ricky's song, "Many and Great," visit the Open Your Hymnal website. 

The recordings of "Transfiguration" was produced by OCP. "Eat This Bread" and "Give Us Peace" were produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#024: Understanding Liturgical Assessment (with Mike Novak)

 Mike Novak

Mike Novak

In last week’s episode, we explored the concept of operational development with Kathy Bartlett. In that conversation, we examined how we in pastoral ministry should apply a strategic, organizational lens to the way we view our work in order to be both efficient and effective. 

Today, we are continuing this thread of practical, strategic, and professional topics by discussing the concept of liturgical assessment. Now, before you hit the “skip” button or push “pause,” consider this question for a moment. How effective are your parish liturgies? If your response was negative, what high impact steps can your community take to address this ineffectiveness? If your response was positive, what objective evidence can you point to in order to back up your claim? 

Liturgical assessment is NOT about imposing or challenging musical or aesthetic taste, it is NOT about evaluating the personal worth of you or your volunteer ministers, and it certainly isn’t about the style wars. It is about giving good, accurate, real information about the experience of those who participate in your liturgies so that you know what your community does well and so that you know exactly what to do about those things your community doesn’t do so well. To help us understand the process, we’ll speak with assessment expert Mike Novak.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Mike Novak, visit his biography page at World Library Publications. 

You can download the three resources mentioned in the conversation using the links below. NOTE: These were created by Mike Novak and are his intellectual property. The files are included here for your reference and your professional use. Please ensure that you properly credit the source of these resources. 

Handout 1: Overview of the Parish Liturgy Assessment Process

Handout 2: Liturgy Assessment Tool

Handout 3: Sample Assessment Report

The recordings of "They'll Know We Are Christians" was produced by World Library Publications. "Give Us Peace" was produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#023: The Importance of Parish Organizational Development (with Kathy Bartlett)

 Kathy Bartlett

Kathy Bartlett

If you examine professional development for pastoral ministers, you see a not-surprising array of topics and offerings. At conventions, parish and diocesan workshops, and even graduate programs, you’ll find classes in music, sacramental theology, scripture, liturgy, and spirituality. These are, of course, well and good. But what about the more practical, even mundane, topics necessary for successful ministry? What about operational planning? Or strategic planning? Or navigating interpersonal relationships? Or budgeting?

In today’s episode, we explore the concept of operational development and why these practical realities are of great importance for anyone who wants their ministry to be both efficient and effective. To do so, we’ll speak with organizational expert Kathy Bartlett, and we’ll hear tips for running an effective parish staff meeting in today’s Ministry Moment.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about St. Matthew's Catholic Church in Charlotte, North Carolina, visit the parish website. You can read an article about the parish, the largest in the United States, from the May 1, 2017 issue of America Magazine.

If you haven't done so yet, go back and listen to our conversation with Leisa Anslingerin Episode #014. We discuss discovering and living your strengths, and other topics also addressed in this episode.

There were lots of organizations mentioned in our conversation! You can find more information by following the links below. 

You can read articles about leading effective parish staff meetings at the Christianity Today ("How to Run a Great Staff Meeting") and Ministry Best Practices ("How to Make Meetings Stink Less") websites. 

The recordings of "All Are Welcome (All Belong)" was produced by OCP. "Give Us Peace" was produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#022: How Firm A Foundation - Gathering and Word (with Dr. Elaine Rendler)

 Dr. Elaine Rendler

Dr. Elaine Rendler

We are past the half-way point of summer. In many parishes around the country, the pace of liturgical life slows a bit during these traditional vacation months. While we hope you are all enjoying some well-deserved vacation, or, at least, a lighter rehearsal schedule, we also hope you are able to take advantage of these months for some professional reflection and development.

Last week we gathered in Baltimore for the 41stNPM national convention. Almost two thousand participants spent five days learning, praying, and networking in the historical birthplace of American Catholicism. Like any convention, there were repertoire sessions to introduce new music, concerts, keynote presentations, and workshop sessions to both introduce new concepts and practices and to revisit the basics. Many of these sessions were recorded, and we look forward to bringing you some of this captured content in future Ministry Monday episodes and in the member’s only section of the NPM website.

Today, we’ll hear an archived presentation from one of this year’s NPM presenters, Dr. Elaine Rendler. Recorded at the twenty-fifth NPM national convention in 2001, Dr. Rendler breaks open the rite of gathering and the liturgy of the word. In doing so, Elaine reminds us of the structure of the liturgy, the theological and liturgical underpinnings, and challenges us to look closely at our own practice. For some of our listeners, this might be new information. For others, this will be familiar content. Regardless, we hope that today’s episode will encourage you to take some time to evaluate your community’s practice of gathering and welcoming, and that you will be able to take away some practical steps for when your full liturgical ministry returns at the end of the season.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Dr. Elaine Rendler and her work, visit her composer page at OCP and her faculty page at George Mason University. You can find out more about Today's Liturgy, including how to subscribe, by visiting the OCP website.

The recording of "You Are My Shepherd" was produced by OCP. The recording of "Give Us Peace" was produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#021: Live from the convention! (with Amanda Plazek Bruce)

 Amanda Plazek Bruce

Amanda Plazek Bruce

It’s convention week, and today Ministry Monday is coming to you from the exhibit hall at the 2018 NPM national convention in Baltimore, Maryland. The convention started literally minutes ago with the ringing the NPM bell and the official welcome from NPM president Stephen Petrunak. The energy level is high, and participants are meeting friends old and new. 

For me, this week will bring a marathon of interviews future episodes of this podcast, the Open Your Hymnal podcast, and live broadcasts of convention plenum addresses and keynote sessions. Of course, like any good convention, I am sure there will be times for reuniting and socializing. 

Today’s episode features a conversation with Amanda Plazek Bruce. Amanda is the chair of the NPM technology interest section, and one of the live broadcast cohosts for the week. In addition to her work for NPM, Amanda is an example of how important conventions like this can be, both in terms of professional learning and in terms of mentorship and invitation. 

 

SHOW NOTES

Follow the NPM convention on Facebook. While you are there, be sure to post your own favorite or memorable convention experience, and tell us about how you were invited and encouraged.  Also, tune in to the NPM YouTube page for live broadcasts of keynote addresses, plenum sessions, and select evening concerts.

To learn more about the 41st national convention, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

The recording of "Lord You Give the Great Commission" was produced by OCP, and the recording of "Give Us Peace" was produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#020: Ambassadors of Joy (with Jesse Manibusan)

 Jesse Manibusan with the One Call Institute leadership team (Jes Garceau, Matt Reichert, Zack Stachowski, and Carmen Grace Poppert)

Jesse Manibusan with the One Call Institute leadership team (Jes Garceau, Matt Reichert, Zack Stachowski, and Carmen Grace Poppert)

With the Independence Day holiday coming up this week, many of us are thinking about a day off. For me, I’m not thinking about a day off on Wednesday, I’m thinking about today. We have just finished our inaugural One Call Institute for young pastoral musicians and their advocates. An outstanding group of young people, adults in ministry who work with young people, and team members gathered for an incredible week of learning, prayer, formation, and fellowship on the campus of Saint John’s Abbey and University in Central Minnesota. 

I come away from the week inspired, filled with hope for the future, and – needless to say – exhausted. So, in place of our customary interview, today we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and by me, is a special project aimed at breaking open the best-loved and most-common liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire. Each episode explores one song and features conversation with the composer and, sometimes, special guests. 

We are pleased to present today our interview with composer Jesse Manibusan about his song “Open My Eyes.” This song has been a staple of parishes around the world. Yet, though you may know the song well, there are new corners to explore and messages to consider.Jesse was able to join the One Call Institute community this year as a guest artist for a special evening of song, celebration, and discipleship formation.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Jesse Manibusan and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP. You can also visit his website: www.jessemanibusan.com

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase the other Jesse Manibusan song you heard in the episode, "Malo! Malo! Thanks Be to God." The recording of "Take All the Lost Home" by Joe Wise can be purchased from GIA Publications.

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording of "Open My Eyes" (arranged and performed by Jon Sarta) from iTunes. 

You can read the article about the Westminster study that Zack referenced at the University of Westminster's homepage.

You can learn more about the One Call Institute at www.onecallinstitute.org. You can see photos and videos from the week by visiting the One Call Facebook page.

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

The recordings of "How Can I Keep from Singing?" and "Give Us Peace" were produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#019: Should We? - or - How Can We Not? (with Rory Cooney)

 Rory Cooney

Rory Cooney

I am willing to wager that all of us engaged in pastoral ministry would consider ourselves to be disciples – believers of the Good News, followers of Christ. I’m also willing to wager that, just like the first disciples, we are imperfect – sometime stumbling, sometimes second-guessing, sometimes fearful and unsure. 

Ministry is never easy, and it is made all the more difficult in challenging times like these. We are called to accompany those to whom we minister as we all traverse the rocky road of politics, of interpersonal relationships, of messy life events, and more. We are called to help make sense of what all seems, at times, to be senseless. We are called to express the Truth with love and honesty. 

In today’s episode, we discuss how to think about the ways we can – or should – acknowledge and respond to the issues happening in our nation and our world. It’s something I’ve been thinking about a lot lately, as we’ve seen news stories and social media commentary about immigration policy and strategy, especially on our southern border. To help frame these issues, we’ll hear from Rory Cooney. I have long admired Rory for his beautiful compositions and profound texts. More so, I marvel at Rory’s ability to speak so well about how the Gospel meets real life. Today, he will share some of his wisdom, his study, and his experience.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Rory Cooney and his other compositions, visit his composer pages at GIA PublicationsOCP, and WLP. Also, be sure to check out his blog, "Gentle Reign". You can access the full text of the blog post quoted in the episodes Ministry Monday here

The recordings of "A Place Called Home" and "Give Us Peace" were produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.