#057: Evangelization, Inclusion, and the Culture Wars (with Fr. James Martin, SJ) - REPLAY

Fr. James Martin, SJ

Fr. James Martin, SJ

This is a special re-broadcast of our episode from April, 2018.

Just as the Advent season prepares us for the Incarnation, and the Lenten season prepares us for the Resurrection, we know that the celebration of the Easter season prepares us for Commissioning: “Go, make disciples of all nations.” The Gospel readings of this season serve as a primer in discipleship: the model of the Good Shepherd, the vines bearing much fruit, the command to love one another as Christ has loved us. Yet, though it is, indeed, Good News, spreading the Gospel is hard work! There are many barriers in our way: limits of time and resources, an unfriendly or inhospitable popular culture, and – sometimes the biggest barrier of all – ourselves.

In today’s episode, we explore the topic of evangelization – how do we in pastoral ministry reach beyond those already active and in attendance? What works? What doesn’t? What mindset must we cultivate in order to be successful? We’ll also discuss two subsidiary topics: maintaining healthy balance, and navigating the culture wars being waged within the Church. To do so, we’ll hear from two people renowned for their efforts at evangelization: Fr. James Martin, SJ, and Jean Vanier.

 

SHOW NOTES

Fr. James Martin, SJ, is a Jesuit priest, editor at large of America magazine, consultor to the Vatican's Secretariat for Communications, and author of numerous books, including the New York Times bestsellers “Building A Bridge,” "Jesus: A Pilgrimage," and "The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything." You can find out more about his ministry and speaking engagements on his Facebook page.

To listen to more conversation with Fr. Jim, listen to the special feature from the Open Your Hymnal podcast.

To learn more about Jean Vanier, visit the L'Arche website

The recording of "Hosea” was produced by OCP.  The piano recording of "Break Bread Together" was performed by Fr. Robert Koopmann, OSB, on the album Sacred Improvisations

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#056: Engaging Young People with the One Call Institute (with Jes Garceau)

Jes Garceau

Jes Garceau

One of the many ways that NPM is able to support the work of pastoral musicians is through institutes. These programs feature a smaller, more intimate, more intense learning environment. In the coming weeks, we’ll be featuring these institutes in our Ministry Monday conversations.

I am proud to co-direct the One Call Institute, a proud member program of NPM. Taking place this coming summer from June 25 to June 30, the focus of One Call is to engage, support, and empower young people to use their gifts of music and leadership in service to the Church. We also shape adults who work in ministry, equipping them with the skills, information, and attitudes necessary to continue the work of engaging young people in their home communities. As an aside, you should know that applications are due on April 15, and our registrations have been pouring in. 

Today, I am pleased to welcome Jes Garceau, another One Call co-director to the show. Yes, we’ll talk about the program in the hopes that you’ll consider sending young people from your parish, and perhaps consider attending yourself. I hope you’ll listen as we share important details about the program. Beyond this, I’m really pleased that you will hear from Jes herself. With a background in liturgical ministry and corporate management, Jes is one of the most important voices and resources in effective ministry organization and administration. We’ll also hear a selection from composer Sally Ann Morris in this week’s “Ministry Moment”.

SHOW NOTES

You can read more about Jes by visiting the “About Us” page of the One Call Institute website.

To find out more information about One Call, and to complete your application, visit the “Apply” page today!

The recording of “All That is Hidden” (Bernadette Farrell) is published by OCP. The recordings of “Will You Hold Me in the Light?” (Adam Tice/Sally Ann Morris), and “Jerusalem, My Destiny” (Rory Cooney) are published by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#055: Understanding Lent as Pilgrimage

Sr. Patricia Gallagher, OP

Sr. Patricia Gallagher, OP

Many of us have a complex relationship with Lent. It’s a season that some love and some dread. It’s often a season that, intellectually, we appreciate and anticipate but, in reality, experience in a way that leaves us wanting more. Purely from a practical perspective, Lent is sometimes difficult to experience in a full and meaningful way when we are so occupied with preparations for the Triduum and Easter season.

That’s the place where we are beginning today: the ways that Lent prepares us for the Triduum and for Easter. If we think about this time of year as a “unified sequence,” as our guest writer calls it, we can see more clearly the influences that shape the ways we think about Lent, the way we experience it, and – ultimately – the way we experience the Easter joy. We’ll hear today from an article written by Sr. Patricia Gallagher, OP, and we’ll hear a beautiful setting of a text by Saint Clare in a musical “Ministry Moment.”

SHOW NOTES

You can read the full article, “Take Another Look at Lent: As Pilgrimage,” on the NPM website.

The recording of “Tis Good Lord to be Here” (Joseph Robinson) is published by OCP. The recordings of “Lenten Suite” (arr. Paul Tate), “The Mirror of Eternity” (James Chepponis), and “Jerusalem, My Destiny” (Rory Cooney) are published by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#054: Sharing the Triduum (with Fr. Paul Turner) - REPLAY

Fr. Paul Turner

Fr. Paul Turner

This is a special rebroadcast of our episode from March, 2018.

Our topic today is “looking forward.” While the new liturgical year is many months away, the new fiscal year is not. Across the country, dioceses have been studying and making preparations for new administrative and organizational realities, including clustered parishes. 

Our guest today, Fr. Paul Turner, shares liturgical considerations and opportunities that are present in clustered communities. We also hear the words of the late Bishop Ken Untener (1937-2004), written in honor of Archbishop Oscar Romero. 

 

SHOW NOTES

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

You can learn more about Fr. Paul Turner, view his many workshop topics, and read his articles and blog posts at his website: www.paulturner.org

The prayer commonly referred to as the "Oscar Romero Prayer" was written by Bishop Ken Untener. You can find it on the website of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops(USCCB).

"From Ashes to the Living Font" is published by World Library Publications.

For further reading: Read "Where Two or Three Are Gathered: Clustered Parishes Are Our Future," written by Kristi Bevens, in Obsculta. You can find resources related to clustered parishes and planning from both the Archdiocese of Dubuque and the Archdiocese of Detroit

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#053: Celebrating Black Sacred Music

Leon Roberts

Leon Roberts

In place of our customary interview, today we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and by me, is an independent project aimed at exploring liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire through interviews with composers and special guests. 

Today, we’re focusing on the rich heritage of the Black sacred music tradition, and we’re blessed to be joined by two important voices: Leon Roberts (recorded in a presentation from 1985), and Lynne Gray. Leon and Lynne provide an exploration of the treasury of hymns, spirituals, and gospel songs. You’ll hear lots of standard and familiar music, and you’ll also hear selections from several contemporary composers. 

Lynne Gray

Lynne Gray

Episode links

You can find out more about the work of Leon Roberts by visiting his composer pages at OCP and GIA Publications. You can find out more about Lynne Gray and her work by visiting St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church and the Duke Ellington School of the Arts.

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

You can purchase the song recordings you heard in this episode: “We’ve Come This Far By Faith” (Goodson), “With Hands Lifted Up” (traditional), “Traditional Prayer with Moans” (anonymous), “Deep River” (anonymous), “Great is Thy Faithfulness” (traditional), “The Solid Rock (My Hope is Built on Nothing Less)” (Mote), “Father, I Stretch My Hands to Thee” (Wesley), “Lead Me, Guide Me” (Akers), “We Shall Walk Through the Valley in Peace” (Hatter), “The Lord is Blessing Me Right Now” (traditional), “Taste and See” (Moore), “Psalm 27: The Lord is My Light” (Harbor), “Lord, I Love You (God is So Good)” (Jansen), “Hail, Queen of Heaven” (Holland), “Holy, Holy, Holy” from the Mass of New Beginnings (Petty), “You’re the One” (Roberts).

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All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#052: Of Womb and Tomb (with Kate Williams)

Kate Williams

Kate Williams

In the book of Ecclesiastes, we hear that “there is a season for everything: a time to be born, and a time to die; a time to laugh, and a time to mourn.” As pastoral ministers, we know that there is a need for pastoral ministry in all seasons of life. Our work calls us to be attentive and present in times of great joy and celebration as well as in times of great sadness and mourning. Sometimes we do better with the celebrating than the mourning.

Today, we’re discussing ministry to those who know the pain of loss. Specifically, we are talking about ministry to those who have struggled with the inability to conceive, who know the pain of losing a child before birth, and those who have faced their child’s death at the time of birth. How are we present to them? How do we minister in this time of deep and, often, isolated sadness? How can we accompany them on their grief journey? To explore these questions and more, we’ll speak with author and editor Kate Williams.

SHOW NOTES

You can learn more about Kate Williams by visiting the GIA Publications staff page.

You can order the book, “Of Womb and Tomb,” by visiting the GIA Publications website. Here you can also order the accompanying music collection, both in print and audio recording.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Turn My Heart, O God” (Marty Haugen), and “I Have Been Anointed” (Steve Warner).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#051: Maintaining Unity in Good Times and In Bad (with Bishop Mark Seitz)

Bishop Mark Seitz

Bishop Mark Seitz

When we started publishing this podcast, our first guest was Steve Petrunak, the president of NPM. Now, we are ending our first year of weekly programs with another leader in our organization, our episcopal moderator. 

What’s an episcopal moderator do, you ask? Great question. We discussed the role with Bishop Mark Seitz of El Paso, Texas, the current liaison between NPM and the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. We also discussed the current credibility crisis facing the Church, sex abuse, and the role pastoral musicians can play in bringing forth healing. We’ll hear all of this in today’s interview, and we’ll also hear from author Bill Huebsch about teaching grace to others in this week’s “Ministry Moment.”

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Bishop Mark Seitz and his work, visit the Diocese of El Paso website.

You can read Bishop Seitz’ letter to NPM members on the NPM website. You can access the 2019 Foley Lecture, given by Kim Daniels, on crisis and communication in the Church here.

You can find the book “Grace: God’s Greatest Gift” by author Bill Huebsch at Twenty-Third Publications.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “O How Blessed” (Dan Schutte), instrumental arrangement of “Blest Are They” (arr. David Feily), and “I Have Been Anointed” (Steve Warner).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#050: Physical Health and the Pastoral Musician (with Dr. Paul Schaefer)

Dr. Paul Schaefer

Dr. Paul Schaefer

The most recent issue of Pastoral Musicmagazine is all about health. It contains perspectives on stress, finding and maintaining balance, forgiveness, healing, and more. I hope that, by now, you’ve had a chance to read through it.

To be honest, pastoral musicians are not known for effective health routines. We have stressful and emotionally-demanding jobs. We regularly spend hours sitting in meetings. Many of us don’t maintain regular or healthy eating habits. Even more of us find it difficult to find time to exercise. The list goes on.   

Today, we’re focusing on physical health. It’s time for our collective trip to the doctor for our annual check-up. We’ll talk about maintaining healthy habits, balance, and the unique physical health needs of musicians. To do so, we’ll speak with Dr. Paul Schaefer. We’ll also hear about personal renewal from Matthew Walsh in today’s Ministry Moment. 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Dr. Paul Schaefer and his work, visit his biography page on the Lakeview Health website.

Today’s featured article was originally published in the December-January 1982 issue of Pastoral Music magazine. The most recent issue of Pastoral Music, titled “Musician, Heal Thyself: The Delicate, Necessary, and Elusive Art of Self-Care” was published in January of 2019.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “To Be Fishers of Women and Men” (Kathy Powell) and “I Have Been Anointed” (Steve Warner).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#049: Catholic Schools Week Edition

Dr. Elaine Rendler

Dr. Elaine Rendler

This week, across the country, thousands of parish communities are celebrating Catholic Schools Week. My connections to Catholic school are many – an educator, administrator, graduate, current parent, and more. I know many of you have connections to Catholic schools, too, and at various levels. But what I’d like to focus on today is how our work as pastoral musicians and liturgists intersects with the work of Catholic education. In some communities, the connection between parish and school is close and cooperative. In others, the parish and school operate so independently of one another that, save for physical proximity, you’d never know they were connected. 

I’m hoping to explore these complex realities directly and in depth in future episodes. Today, however, we’re starting with something more basic. How do we engage the children of our parish in worship? How do we invite youth to appreciate a variety of traditional and contemporary liturgical music styles? To address these questions, we’ll begin with some thoughts from Dr. Elaine Rendler. We’ll also hear from the Congregation on Catholic Education in this week’s Ministry Moment. 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Dr. Elaine Rendler and her work, visit her composer page at OCP and her faculty page at George Mason University. You can find out more about Today's Liturgy, including how to subscribe, by visiting the OCP website.

Today’s featured article was originally published in the April-May 1998 issue of Pastoral Music magazine. To read the full text of “The Catholic School on the Threshold of the Third Millennium,” visit the Vatican website.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Love Divine, All Love’s Excelling” (HYFRYDOL, text by Charles Wesley) and “I Have Been Anointed” (Steve Warner).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#048: Improving Choral Rehearsals (with Michael Kemp)

Michael Kemp

Michael Kemp

Some of the most common resolutions set by musicians have to do with rehearing: we resolve to rehearse more, to rehearse better, to develop better habits, and so forth. As directors and leaders of music ensembles, we have the added need to improve our rehearsal design, the skills of our ensemble members, and their rehearsal technique.

Today, we’ll hear a special workshop presentation from Michael Kemp. Offered at the 2018 NPM convention in Baltimore, Michael presented a workshop titled “Igniting Choral Rehearsals with Efficiency, Artistry, and Motivation.” In this session, participants learned how to prepare rehearsals in such a way as to inspire singers and increase the beauty of their sound. Participants also examined sample anthems with annotations that helped show how to attain dynamic improvements in their choirs, creating an intriguing experience for choir members, and a tremendous boost to skill-building. 

SHOW NOTES

To find out more about Michael Kemp’s compositions and publications, visit his composer page at GIA Publications and his personal website, www.michaelkemp.org.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “The Summons” (Bell), and “I Send You Out” (Angotti).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. While you are there, check out the program and register for the 2019 NPM National Convention!

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.