Zack Stachowski

#056: Engaging Young People with the One Call Institute (with Jes Garceau)

Jes Garceau

Jes Garceau

One of the many ways that NPM is able to support the work of pastoral musicians is through institutes. These programs feature a smaller, more intimate, more intense learning environment. In the coming weeks, we’ll be featuring these institutes in our Ministry Monday conversations.

I am proud to co-direct the One Call Institute, a proud member program of NPM. Taking place this coming summer from June 25 to June 30, the focus of One Call is to engage, support, and empower young people to use their gifts of music and leadership in service to the Church. We also shape adults who work in ministry, equipping them with the skills, information, and attitudes necessary to continue the work of engaging young people in their home communities. As an aside, you should know that applications are due on April 15, and our registrations have been pouring in. 

Today, I am pleased to welcome Jes Garceau, another One Call co-director to the show. Yes, we’ll talk about the program in the hopes that you’ll consider sending young people from your parish, and perhaps consider attending yourself. I hope you’ll listen as we share important details about the program. Beyond this, I’m really pleased that you will hear from Jes herself. With a background in liturgical ministry and corporate management, Jes is one of the most important voices and resources in effective ministry organization and administration. We’ll also hear a selection from composer Sally Ann Morris in this week’s “Ministry Moment”.

SHOW NOTES

You can read more about Jes by visiting the “About Us” page of the One Call Institute website.

To find out more information about One Call, and to complete your application, visit the “Apply” page today!

The recording of “All That is Hidden” (Bernadette Farrell) is published by OCP. The recordings of “Will You Hold Me in the Light?” (Adam Tice/Sally Ann Morris), and “Jerusalem, My Destiny” (Rory Cooney) are published by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#044: The Final Countdown (with Carol Browning)

Zack Stachowski, Carol Browning, and Matt Reichert

Zack Stachowski, Carol Browning, and Matt Reichert

With only one calendar week to go before Christmas, we thought we’d provide an opportunity for a little stress break. There are lots of things to be done this week and errands to be run. Today’s show, providing both conversation and musical selections, is something perfect to listen to while you fold worship aids, make those final copies, wrap your gifts, and so forth.

In place of our customary interview, today we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and by me, is a special project aimed at breaking open the best-loved and most-common liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire. Each episode explores one song and features conversation with the composer and, sometimes, special guests. 

We are pleased to present today our interview with composer Carol Browning about her song “Creator of the Stars of Night,” incorporating one of the best-loved melodies of the Advent season. Composer Bob Moore stops by to talk about Carol’s music, and Fr. Anthony Ruff, OSB, gives some historical background to the 1,000-year-old chant hymn at the core of this piece. Plus, you’ll hear a bunch of great additional music in the OYH Playlist.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Carol Browning and her other compositions, visit her composer pages at GIA Publications, MorningStar Music, and Liturgical Press.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording for "Creator of the Stars of Night” from GIA Publications. You can also purchase the other song recordings you heard in this episode: Instrumental arrangement of “Gloria from Mass of Light” (David Haas), “Silent Night" (arr. Steve Petrunak), organ recording of “Creator of the Stars of Night” (arr. John Keys), "Conditor Alma Siderum" (traditional), "Ubi Caritas" (Carol Browning), "O God, Behold Your Family Here" (Bob Moore), “Christ, Circle Round Us" (Dan Schutte), “Peace be With Those” (Carol Browning), “Carol of the Dawn” (Janet Sullivan Whitacre), “Ave Generosa” (Ola Gjielo), and “People Look East” (arr. Marty Haugen). 

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#038: Instrumental Invitation (with Zack Stachowski)

Zack Stachowski

Zack Stachowski

You’ve heard us mention repeatedly the importance of invitation in our work as pastoral ministers. It’s a challenging topic, partly because we need to learn how to do it (though we’ve got a pretty good idea). Mostly, it’s difficult because invitation is often an exercise in vulnerability. We’ve got to relearn, retrain, risk failure, and so forth. 

Today, we’re digging deeper into the topic of invitation to speak specifically about instrumentalists. Why do we invite instrumentalists differently than we do singers? What can we do to better extend welcome to the members of our community who have instrumental skills to offer? We’ll speak with composer and teacher Zack Stachowski, who will issue a special Christmas season challenge. We’ll also hear from the writings of Fr. Matthew Kelty in this week’s Ministry Moment.

SHOW NOTES

You can find out more about Zack Stachowski and his work by visiting the home pages for the One Call Institute and the Open Your Hymnal podcast.

For more information about Give Us This Day, visit Liturgical Press.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Behold the Lamb” (Willett), and “Give Us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#020: Ambassadors of Joy (with Jesse Manibusan)

Jesse Manibusan with the One Call Institute leadership team (Jes Garceau, Matt Reichert, Zack Stachowski, and Carmen Grace Poppert)

Jesse Manibusan with the One Call Institute leadership team (Jes Garceau, Matt Reichert, Zack Stachowski, and Carmen Grace Poppert)

With the Independence Day holiday coming up this week, many of us are thinking about a day off. For me, I’m not thinking about a day off on Wednesday, I’m thinking about today. We have just finished our inaugural One Call Institute for young pastoral musicians and their advocates. An outstanding group of young people, adults in ministry who work with young people, and team members gathered for an incredible week of learning, prayer, formation, and fellowship on the campus of Saint John’s Abbey and University in Central Minnesota. 

I come away from the week inspired, filled with hope for the future, and – needless to say – exhausted. So, in place of our customary interview, today we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and by me, is a special project aimed at breaking open the best-loved and most-common liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire. Each episode explores one song and features conversation with the composer and, sometimes, special guests. 

We are pleased to present today our interview with composer Jesse Manibusan about his song “Open My Eyes.” This song has been a staple of parishes around the world. Yet, though you may know the song well, there are new corners to explore and messages to consider.Jesse was able to join the One Call Institute community this year as a guest artist for a special evening of song, celebration, and discipleship formation.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Jesse Manibusan and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP. You can also visit his website: www.jessemanibusan.com

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase the other Jesse Manibusan song you heard in the episode, "Malo! Malo! Thanks Be to God." The recording of "Take All the Lost Home" by Joe Wise can be purchased from GIA Publications.

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording of "Open My Eyes" (arranged and performed by Jon Sarta) from iTunes. 

You can read the article about the Westminster study that Zack referenced at the University of Westminster's homepage.

You can learn more about the One Call Institute at www.onecallinstitute.org. You can see photos and videos from the week by visiting the One Call Facebook page.

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

The recordings of "How Can I Keep from Singing?" and "Give Us Peace" were produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#012: May, the Month of Mary (with Carey Landry)

Matt Reichert, Carey Landry, and Zack Stachowski

Matt Reichert, Carey Landry, and Zack Stachowski

As we in the United States look forward to celebrating Mother’s Day this coming Sunday, we in the Church are celebrating “Mother’s Month.” The custom of honoring the Blessed Virgin Mary during the month of May dates back as early as the Thirteenth Century, with special prayers, devotions, celebrations, and – of course – special music.

Today, in place of our customary interview, we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and Matt Reichert, is a special project aimed at breaking open the best-loved and most-common liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire. Each episode explores one song and features conversation with the composer and, sometimes, special guests. 

To commemorate this Marian month, we are pleased to present today our interview with composer Carey Landry about his song “Hail Mary: Gentle Woman.” Originally released in the 1970s, this song has been a staple of parishes around the world. Yet, though you may know the song well, there are new corners to explore and messages to consider.   

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Carey Landry and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the original song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase the other Carey Landry songs you heard in this episode: "Only a Shadow," "Peace is Flowing Like a River," and "Bloom Where You're Planted."

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording (arranged and performed by Paul Tate) from GIA Publications. You can also purchase a copy of the choral recording (arranged by Richard Proulx and performed by the Cathedral Singers) and a copy of Dan Kantor's "Ave Maria" from GIA Publications. 

You can watch the video recording of Bobby McFerrin's live concert performance of the Bach/Gounod "Ave Maria", with the audience singing along, on YouTube. 

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

The recording of "Resucito" was produced by OCP.  

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.