Pope Francis

#069: Exploring NPM 2.0 (with Jeremy Helmes)

Jeremy Helmes

Jeremy Helmes

We’ve been enjoying a little summer break here at Ministry Monday. It’s been a few weeks since we released a new episode. In that time, lots has been happening. The annual Guitar and Ensemble Institute just wrapped up. The second annual One Call Institute was a wild success. And, of course, the national convention was held in Raleigh, North Carolina. 

That’s where I want to begin, back in Raleigh. There has been much ongoing conversation about this convention and, specifically, the roll-out of a new strategic vision for the association, branded as “NPM 2.0.” To say it plain, reactions were mixed. Some elements of the new vision were warmly received while others caused many questions (or even pushback). 

So, our conversation today will explore this NPM 2.0 proposal a little more. What is being proposed? What will the process look like? How will we as members be involved? Is it a “done deal,” or is the vision still being shaped and formed? To help us out, we’ll speak with Jeremy Helmes, the current Chair of the NPM Board of Directors. 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Jeremy Helmes and NPM’s leadership, visit the NPM website. You can also find his book, “Three Great Days: Preparing the Liturgies of the Paschal Triduum” from Liturgical Press.

You can read more about NPM 2.0 and access all of the documents associated with the process by visiting the NPM website.

The recordings of “O God, Our Help in Ages Past” (William Croft, Isaac Watts) was produced by OCP. The recording of “To the Poor a Lasting Treasure” (Fr. Francis Patrick O’Brien) is produced by GIA Publications. The recording of “Go Out” (W. Clifford Petty) is produced by World Library Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#064: Finding and Living Our Strengths (with Leisa Anslinger) - REPLAY

Leisa Anslinger

Leisa Anslinger

This is a special re-broadcast of our episode from May, 2018.

The celebration of Pentecost demands that we consider not just the ways in which the Spirit is at work in our lives, but also what unique gifts we possess and how we are called to use them in service to others. To paraphrase the reading from Corinthians, there are many different gifts, and we have each received them for some benefit.

But, though the spirit is a great gift-giver, we aren’t always great gift-receivers. It is more natural for us to covet the gifts and talents of others than to see the value of what we ourselves possess. It’s hard to see how our strengths fit into the talent matrix of our families or the communities to which we belong. Yet, these strengths are, indeed, unique to us, and the employment of these talents is critical for the realization of the work of the Spirit. 

In today’s episode, we explore the concept of strengths, what they are, how to identify them, and how an authentic understanding and stewardship of strengths can engage our entire parish community. To do so, we’ll speak with stewardship expert Leisa Anslinger, and we’ll hear again from Pope Francis in this week’s Ministry Moment.

 

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Leisa Anslinger and her work, visit the Catholic Life and Faith website.

To read more about Strengths Finder and the Living Your Strengths program, visit the Gallup Organization's website.

To read the full text of Pope Francis' remarks from his General Audience on April 24, 2013, visit the Vatican website.

The recording of "Holy God, We Praise Thy Name" was produced by ILP. The recording of "Give Us Peace" was produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

For more information about the One Call Institute, visit the program website at www.onecallinstitute.org.

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#045: Learning Goals for the New Year (with Timothy Johnston)

Timothy Johnston

Timothy Johnston

Before we begin, let me wish all of you a very Merry Christmas. I am sure that some of you are still recovering from last week. Know that your work is greatly appreciated. Each of your communities is blessed with your efforts, your dedication, and your leadership. So on behalf of all of them, and on behalf of NPM, thank you!

While we still have plenty of Christmas season remaining, today we are turning our attention to the New Year. Traditionally, at the end of December, we set resolutions or goals for the new calendar year ahead. Over the next few episodes, we’ll be looking at ministerial resolutions to help inform your own goals and targets.  We’ll focus on formation, planning, and health.

To kick us off, we’ll speak today with editor and liturgy consultant Timothy Johnston about setting a vision for professional development. We’ll also hear some New Year’s resolutions from Pope Francis in this week’s Ministry Moment.

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Timothy Johnston’s work, visit the Liturgy Training Publications website.

For more information about the “Essentials of Catholic Liturgy” professional development course, offered as an online partnership between LTP and NPM, visit the NPM website.

To read the full text of Pope Francis’ address to Vatican employees and their families, visit the Vatican website.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “The First Noel” (traditional), and “Hark, the Herald Angels Sing” (arr Petrunak).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#040: Giving Thanks

Thanksgiving.jpg

Here in the United States, we are gearing up for another holiday week. I don’t know about all of you, but, for myriad reasons, Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. I enjoy the food, the counting of blessings, the time spent with family and friends, the pause, the reflection. 

But, while my enthusiasm for Thanksgiving has not waned over the years, the simplicity of my understanding has. I recognize that Thanksgiving can stir a complex and sometimes conflicting sense of emotion. Not all celebrations are peaceful. Not all tallies of blessings seem to be as long. Not all family gatherings are akin to Norman Rockwell. 

In a particular way this year, I think of the challenges we face in our Church, our communities, country, and our world. Scandal. Division. Violence. Natural disasters. Illness. War. Anger. Apathy. 

So, today, in the midst of the messiness of life, we are pausing to give thanks. To do so, we’ll hear from the writings of four voices, each helping explore what it means to be grateful. I’m hoping you’ll find this to be a sort of mini-retreat, and so I’ve interspersed music selections between each reading. If you can’t listen to the entire episode at once, listen to a portion each day. I hope you are able to find time this week to let these words and melodies sink in, challenging and affirming, and, in a special way, feeding and forming. 

SHOW NOTES

You can find like to the works you heard read in today’s episode by clicking on the name of the author: Abraham Lincoln, Fr. Romano Guardini, Pope Francis, Sr. Joan Chittister, OSB, and Br. David Steindl-Rast, OSB.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Come You Thankful People Come” (arr. Alonso), piano improvisation on “Simple Gifts,” “We Plow the Fields and Scatter,” “Thanks Be to Thee,” (Handel), “O God You Search Me” (Farrell), “Earth and All Stars,” and “Give Us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#039: Formation and Connection, Delivered to Your Doorstep (with Kathy Felong)

Kathy Felong

Kathy Felong

This past year, NPM offered its forty-first convention. For more than four decades, NPM has been gathering, forming, and celebrating pastoral musicians in national and regional conventions offered across the country. For just as long – in fact, for a little longer – NPM has offered formation, celebration, and connection through the publication of Pastoral Music magazine. 

Today, we’re talking about the NPM magazine as it transitions to a new editorial staff. We’ll discuss the following questions: Why, when we so often hear that print media is dying, does NPM continue to offer a magazine? What impact does NPM hope the magazine will have on the practice of its members? What can we expect to find in the new issue when it lands in our mailboxes in a few weeks? And more. To explore these questions, we’ll speak with Kathy Felong, the new editor of NPM’s magazine. We’ll also hear an excerpt from Pope Francis’ message on World Communications Day 2018 in this week’s Ministry Moment.

SHOW NOTES

The newest issue of Pastoral Music will be arriving in mailboxes around Thanksgiving Day. Members of NPM automatically receive a copy. If you aren’t a member yet, sign up today!

For more information about Beyond Strumming, visit GIA Publications.

The music you heard in today’s episode: “Find Us Ready” (Booth), “Piano Improvisation on ‘Break Bread Together’” (Koopmann), and “Give Us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#032: Reimagining Membership - A Call to Action (with Stephen Petrunak)

Steve Petrunak

Steve Petrunak

Take the Ministry Monday listener survey!

When we began this podcast, our first episode was published on the first Monday of Lent. Our guest for that show was Steve Petrunak, the president of NPM. In that episode we spoke about Steve’s vision for NPM, some of the projects that were in the works, and more. Now, thirty-one episodes later, we’re welcoming Steve back to the show. 

 But, this time, Steve isn’t here to provide an update. In his time as president, NPM has faced a variety of changes both within the organization and without. These changes have sparked new strategies and initiatives, sure, but have also caused questioning and introspection. 

So, today, we’ll speak with Steve about one of the basic building blocks of any organization: membership. How should we, the members of NPM, think about the organization? How to we relate to it? How should it serve our needs? 

 

SHOW NOTES

Take the Ministry Monday listener survey!

To contact Steve Petrunak, visit the “Ask the President” page on the NPM website.

You can read the full text of Gaudete et Exultate on the Vatican’s website.

You can purchase the music you heard in today’s episode: “The Servant Song” (Gillard, arr. O’Brien) and “Give us Peace” (Roberts).

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#014: Finding and Living Our Strengths (with Leisa Anslinger)

Leisa Anslinger

Leisa Anslinger

The celebration of Pentecost demands that we consider not just the ways in which the Spirit is at work in our lives, but also what unique gifts we possess and how we are called to use them in service to others. To paraphrase the reading from Corinthians, there are many different gifts, and we have each received them for some benefit.

But, though the spirit is a great gift-giver, we aren’t always great gift-receivers. It is more natural for us to covet the gifts and talents of others than to see the value of what we ourselves possess. It’s hard to see how our strengths fit into the talent matrix of our families or the communities to which we belong. Yet, these strengths are, indeed, unique to us, and the employment of these talents is critical for the realization of the work of the Spirit. 

In today’s episode, we explore the concept of strengths, what they are, how to identify them, and how an authentic understanding and stewardship of strengths can engage our entire parish community. To do so, we’ll speak with stewardship expert Leisa Anslinger, and we’ll hear again from Pope Francis in this week’s Ministry Moment.

 

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Leisa Anslinger and her work, visit the Catholic Life and Faith website.

To read more about Strengths Finder and the Living Your Strengths program, visit the Gallup Organization's website.

To read the full text of Pope Francis' remarks from his General Audience on April 24, 2013, visit the Vatican website.

The recording of "Holy God, We Praise Thy Name" was produced by ILP. The recording of "Give Us Peace" was produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#013: Exploring Gaudete et Exultate (with Bill Huebsch, featuring Pope Francis)

Bill Huebsch

Bill Huebsch

In our recent conversations with Fr. Michael Leonard Hahn about marriage preparation and Fr. Jim Martin about evangelization, both guests referenced the apostolic exhortations of Pope Francis. Many of our listeners were familiar with these documents, but the discussions in these episodes prompted more than one listener to write in and ask, “where do I find out more?” and “how should I be reading and studying these documents?” and even, “what the heck is an apostolic exhortation?”

In today’s episode, we explore Pope Francis’ newest Apostolic Exhortation, Gaudete et Exultate.In addition to surveying what it says, we will also consider its pastoral implications, and why all of us in pastoral ministry should pay attention to these types of documents. To do so, we’ll speak with an expert on this subject, Bill Huebsch, and we’ll hear from the document itself during our Ministry Moment.

 

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Bill Huebsch and his publications, visit his website: www.billhuebsch.com. Here you can order the reading guide for Gaudete et Exultate

You can order a collection of holiness resources from The Pastoral Center

To read the full text of Gaudete et Exultate, visit the Vatican website.

The recording of "Resucito" was produced by OCP. The piano recording of "Brother James' Air" was performed by Fr. Robert Koopmann, OSB, on the album Sacred Improvisations

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#010: Pastoral Practices in Marriage Preparation (with Fr. Michael Leonard Hahn, OSB, featuring Pope Francis)

Fr. Michael Leonard Hahn, OSB

Fr. Michael Leonard Hahn, OSB

With Easter behind us, celebrations of First Communion and Confirmation underway, and the last remnants of late-season snow storms melting, we can finally let our minds drift with thoughts of summer. While students and families are dreaming of vacation season, with camping trips and time spent at the beach, those who work in pastoral ministry are bracing for wedding season: the planning, the questions, the liturgical struggles, the lost Saturday afternoons, and the never-ending loop of “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring.”    

Pope Francis

Pope Francis

In this episode, we explore the pastoral challenges, opportunities, and implications of marriage celebrations today. To do so, we’ll look at marriage preparation, the changing relationship young couples have with the parish entity, and the navigation of both the universality and particularity of the Church’s celebration. Fr. Michael Leonard Hahn, OSB, helps us examine these topics through the lens of Amoris Laetitia, Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation on love in the family. We’ll also hear excerpts from the document in this week's "Ministry Moment." 

 

SHOW NOTES

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

Fr. Michael Leonard Hahn, OSB, is a monk of Saint John's Abbey and a current doctoral candidate at Boston College. His article, "Amoris Laetitia and Marriage Preparation: Who Can Marry in the Church?" will be published in the May 4, 2018 issue of Commonweal magazine. 

Pope Francis' apostolic exhortation, Amoris Laetitia, was released in April, 2016. You can download the full text in English from the Vatican website.

NPM has published many articles about marriage and wedding liturgies, including a four-issue series of Pastoral Music magazine. You can view these issues - 03-1, 12-5, 16-2, and 20-4 - in the NPM digital publications archive

The recording of "Resucito" was produced by OCP.  

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.