Open Your Hymnal

#060: A Holy Week Companion

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It’s Monday of Holy Week, and we’ve got a long road ahead of us. We all need a little more time for preparation – if not a few minutes more to rehearse, set the environment, prepare worship aids or scripts, then to prepare ourselves for the holiest days of the year. 

So, for today, I’m sharing with you an episode of the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal is an independent podcast project hosted by Zack Stachowski and by me. This episode is a special celebration of Lenten music. You’ll hear a range of great seasonal music from a variety of composers arranged around the final three Gospel readings for Lent, the “Scrutiny Gospels.” These readings are shared with us by composers Meredith Augustin, Ian Callanan, and Luke Rosen. We hope that this presentation serves as both a companion and a source of nourishment.  

Episode links

For more information on the “Open Your Hymnal” podcast, visit www.openyourhymnal.com.

You can purchase the song recordings you heard in this episode: “Parce Domine/Ubi Caritas” (arr. Jeremy Young), piano instrumental of “Lenten Suite” (Paul Tate), “Turn My Heart” (Marty Haugen), “Restless is the Heart” (Bernadette Farrell), “Lead Me, Lord” (Samuel Wesley), “Hosea” (Gregory Norbet), "piano instrumental of “Attende Domine” (Jerry Galipeau), “He Healed the Darkness of My Mind” (David Haas), “Open My Eyes” (Benedetto Marcello, arr. Dale Grotenhuis), “I Want to Walk as a Child of the Light” (Kathleen Thomerson), “Brille Tu Luz” (Stella Garcia Lopez, Rudy Lopez), quodlibet on “Were You There/Amazing Grace” (arr. Marcy Weckler Barr), piano instrumental on “Precious Lord” (Fr. Robert Koopmann, OSB), “With the Lord There is Mercy” (Val Parker), “When Jesus Wept” (William Billings), “We Shall Rise Again” (Jeremy Young), “Give Me Jesus” (arr. Meredith Augustin), and “Attende Domine” (arr. Trevor Thompson).

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All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#059: Hymns from Yesterday for Tomorrow (ft. Dr. Don Saliers)

Dr. Don Saliers

Dr. Don Saliers

At the end of each episode every week, I make a general ask for your suggestions of topics for future episodes. It’s been interesting to see what issues are on your minds, and I’ve done my best to incorporate the needs you’ve shared into the conversations we host. Often, the topics shared with me have to do in one way or another with repertoire development. So, today we’re going to open the repertoire conversation, but know that we’ll be picking up more repertoire-related topics in future episodes and NPM content. In fact, as coincidence would have it, the upcoming May issue of Pastoral Musicmagazine will focus on building repertoire.

So, let’s begin with hymnody. Hymns – both in reference to text and to tune – are so very important in the congregational life of the Church. Often, however, some communities think of hymns as artifacts rather than possibilities. Today we’ll challenge this assumption. To do so, we’ll hear from an article written by Dr. Don Saliers. Originally published in the April 1981 issue of Pastoral Music, Don helps break open what constitutes a “good” hymn and shares insight into the importance of hymn singing and the development of new hymns.

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Dr. Don Saliers, visit his biography page at the Candler School of Theology. You can read the full text of his article from the April 1981 issue of Pastoral Music magazine on the NPM website.

The recording of “Three Days” (THAXTED, arr. Jeffery Honore, text by MD Ridge) is published by OCP. The recordings of “Jesus, Keep Me Near the Cross” (William Howard Doane, text by Fanny Crosby) and “Jerusalem, My Destiny” (Rory Cooney) are published by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#053: Celebrating Black Sacred Music

Leon Roberts

Leon Roberts

In place of our customary interview, today we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and by me, is an independent project aimed at exploring liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire through interviews with composers and special guests. 

Today, we’re focusing on the rich heritage of the Black sacred music tradition, and we’re blessed to be joined by two important voices: Leon Roberts (recorded in a presentation from 1985), and Lynne Gray. Leon and Lynne provide an exploration of the treasury of hymns, spirituals, and gospel songs. You’ll hear lots of standard and familiar music, and you’ll also hear selections from several contemporary composers. 

Lynne Gray

Lynne Gray

Episode links

You can find out more about the work of Leon Roberts by visiting his composer pages at OCP and GIA Publications. You can find out more about Lynne Gray and her work by visiting St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church and the Duke Ellington School of the Arts.

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

You can purchase the song recordings you heard in this episode: “We’ve Come This Far By Faith” (Goodson), “With Hands Lifted Up” (traditional), “Traditional Prayer with Moans” (anonymous), “Deep River” (anonymous), “Great is Thy Faithfulness” (traditional), “The Solid Rock (My Hope is Built on Nothing Less)” (Mote), “Father, I Stretch My Hands to Thee” (Wesley), “Lead Me, Guide Me” (Akers), “We Shall Walk Through the Valley in Peace” (Hatter), “The Lord is Blessing Me Right Now” (traditional), “Taste and See” (Moore), “Psalm 27: The Lord is My Light” (Harbor), “Lord, I Love You (God is So Good)” (Jansen), “Hail, Queen of Heaven” (Holland), “Holy, Holy, Holy” from the Mass of New Beginnings (Petty), “You’re the One” (Roberts).

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All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#020: Ambassadors of Joy (with Jesse Manibusan)

Jesse Manibusan with the One Call Institute leadership team (Jes Garceau, Matt Reichert, Zack Stachowski, and Carmen Grace Poppert)

Jesse Manibusan with the One Call Institute leadership team (Jes Garceau, Matt Reichert, Zack Stachowski, and Carmen Grace Poppert)

With the Independence Day holiday coming up this week, many of us are thinking about a day off. For me, I’m not thinking about a day off on Wednesday, I’m thinking about today. We have just finished our inaugural One Call Institute for young pastoral musicians and their advocates. An outstanding group of young people, adults in ministry who work with young people, and team members gathered for an incredible week of learning, prayer, formation, and fellowship on the campus of Saint John’s Abbey and University in Central Minnesota. 

I come away from the week inspired, filled with hope for the future, and – needless to say – exhausted. So, in place of our customary interview, today we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and by me, is a special project aimed at breaking open the best-loved and most-common liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire. Each episode explores one song and features conversation with the composer and, sometimes, special guests. 

We are pleased to present today our interview with composer Jesse Manibusan about his song “Open My Eyes.” This song has been a staple of parishes around the world. Yet, though you may know the song well, there are new corners to explore and messages to consider.Jesse was able to join the One Call Institute community this year as a guest artist for a special evening of song, celebration, and discipleship formation.

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Jesse Manibusan and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP. You can also visit his website: www.jessemanibusan.com

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase the other Jesse Manibusan song you heard in the episode, "Malo! Malo! Thanks Be to God." The recording of "Take All the Lost Home" by Joe Wise can be purchased from GIA Publications.

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording of "Open My Eyes" (arranged and performed by Jon Sarta) from iTunes. 

You can read the article about the Westminster study that Zack referenced at the University of Westminster's homepage.

You can learn more about the One Call Institute at www.onecallinstitute.org. You can see photos and videos from the week by visiting the One Call Facebook page.

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

The recordings of "How Can I Keep from Singing?" and "Give Us Peace" were produced by GIA Publications.

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

#012: May, the Month of Mary (with Carey Landry)

Matt Reichert, Carey Landry, and Zack Stachowski

Matt Reichert, Carey Landry, and Zack Stachowski

As we in the United States look forward to celebrating Mother’s Day this coming Sunday, we in the Church are celebrating “Mother’s Month.” The custom of honoring the Blessed Virgin Mary during the month of May dates back as early as the Thirteenth Century, with special prayers, devotions, celebrations, and – of course – special music.

Today, in place of our customary interview, we are bringing you an audio program from the Open Your Hymnal podcast. Open Your Hymnal, cohosted by Zack Stachowski and Matt Reichert, is a special project aimed at breaking open the best-loved and most-common liturgical music in the Catholic repertoire. Each episode explores one song and features conversation with the composer and, sometimes, special guests. 

To commemorate this Marian month, we are pleased to present today our interview with composer Carey Landry about his song “Hail Mary: Gentle Woman.” Originally released in the 1970s, this song has been a staple of parishes around the world. Yet, though you may know the song well, there are new corners to explore and messages to consider.   

 

SHOW NOTES

For more information about Carey Landry and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the original song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase the other Carey Landry songs you heard in this episode: "Only a Shadow," "Peace is Flowing Like a River," and "Bloom Where You're Planted."

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording (arranged and performed by Paul Tate) from GIA Publications. You can also purchase a copy of the choral recording (arranged by Richard Proulx and performed by the Cathedral Singers) and a copy of Dan Kantor's "Ave Maria" from GIA Publications. 

You can watch the video recording of Bobby McFerrin's live concert performance of the Bach/Gounod "Ave Maria", with the audience singing along, on YouTube. 

You can listen to more episodes of the Open Your Hymnal podcast at www.openyourhymnal.com.

The recording of "Resucito" was produced by OCP.  

Visit NPM's digital resource library, referenced at the end of the episode. 

To join us this summer at the national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, visit the 2018 NPM convention website

All content of this podcast is property of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.